Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Things and Thoughts


The purpose of learning is not to mold something formless into something having form. It’s not to perform a kind of soul-alchemy by which human dross becomes gold. What is human is not dross, in God’s vision as articulated by the Church, or in Miss Mason’s vision, either. It is not clay. It has within itself, “especially if it accepts the inspiration of the Christian faith,” the capacity to create and sustain civilization.

Me, at Things and Thoughts:  Catholic Homeschooling and Charlotte Mason 

Check it out!

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Why We Homeschool

Not to hide from the world. Not to seal up our children hermetically in Catholic shrinkwrap. Not because I like long skirts and patriarchy.  Not because I couldn't get another job. Not because we're too lazy to get up for the school bus. Not because we prefer ignorance. Not because we suffer from subclinical agoraphobia. Not (your favorite homeschooling stereotype here).

No, truly, the reason we homeschool is this:

. . . two women were discussing a mutual friend who seemed to be very uncertain of herself. She rarely chatted with the others at their meetings, never volunteered for anything, and would not venture to give any opinions unless coaxed. 
The one woman was inclined to call this friend incompetent and dull-witted, but the other saw it a different way. She knew the home life of their mutual friend, and the requirements and expectations that had been perpetually placed on her, and she made this insightful observation: “She hasn’t a chance in the world to be a person. It must be awful: to have what you aren’t equal to thrust upon you, and no chance at all to do what you are equal to.”
And this, from Charlotte Mason:


“The central thought, or rather body of thought, upon which I found, is the somewhat obvious fact that the child is a person with all the possibilities and powers included in personality” (Vol. 1, Preface).

And this:


How many of us know adults who did not excel in the traditional school system as children? They are very talented in many ways, but not in the particular skills that were required in that system. They weren’t wired to play the guess-what-the-teacher-is-thinking game and memorize the expected answers at the expected pace. Yet that system was thrust upon them. And when it became evident that they were not equal to those skills, they were sometimes made to feel less than a person.

And all the rest.  

Monday, September 30, 2013

Some Favorite Things at the End of September

* Learning German with Duolingo.com

*Audubon Field Guide apps  on the Kindles

*Crockpot brown rice cereal:  2 cups long-grain brown rice, 4 cups water, some frozen fruit, vanilla. Cook overnight in crockpot. Makes a supply that will last as long as a week, depending on how many people you have to feed, and how many of them will actually eat hot brown-rice cereal. Enjoy with coconut milk, plus honey if desired. You could make it with milk and it would taste even better, but we're on an elimination diet right now on behalf of a child with persistent stomachaches, so things are rather bland around here . . .

*Art of Problem-Solving Geometry -- the 10th-grader is doing the actual online class, which is pricey but seems worth it, so far, in terms of the challenge it presents. He's done Saxon Algebra 1/2, Algebra I, and Algebra II, and my hope is that the creative-mathematical-thinking bent of AoPS will be a good brain-stretch. He seems to think it's pretty hard, anyway, and that's something.

*Writing for a new, soon-to-be-unveiled Catholic Charlotte Mason group blog. I've written one essay on the Thomist bent of Charlotte Mason's philosophy -- not that I am a Thomist in any formal, credentialed, credible way, you understand;  I'm as accidental a Thomist as Charlotte Mason herself might have been -- and there's more to come, as well as contributions by Michele Quigley, Mary Ellen Barrett, and MacBeth Derham. Stay tuned for more details!

*Life of Fred:  Ice Cream

*The dog's new cooler-weather bursts of energy, which make him, at intervals, hit us up to play the stomping game. We stomp on the floor; he levitates and comes down on his elbows, snorting, and then freight-trains it around the house several times. This game tends to leave the rugs all cattywhompus, and the floors are something worse for the wear, but it's funny to watch. To siphon off some of that energy, Aelred and I took him for a long walk late Saturday afternoon:  down the rail trail to the baseball field and back up to Main Street and the square, where we stopped for a sidewalk-table beer at Osama's. They brought the dog a bowl of water, too. Add that experience to my list of September favorites -- possibly it's one that could extend into October as well.

*Mary Poppins, even if she is so unpleasant that it's hard to see just why Jane and Michael adore her so much.

*Mother Dolores Hart, and Benedictines in general. A friend just lent me Mother Dolores's book, The Ear of the Heart, which means that I can stop rereading In This House of Brede for a little while.

*Otherwise I'm reading Nabokov's King, Queen, Knave. As far as I can tell, I've vanquished all the Agatha Christie in the house.

*Fiction writing. I'm at a bit of an impasse with The Gift Girl -- Maris stuck in tower, how will she get down, where are the good guys all this time? -- so am working on some short fiction as an exercise in going against my own grain.

*The Litany of Humility. Always.




Friday, September 20, 2013

Everybody's Desperate . . .

Which I guess is why, having read this this week, I found myself longing for this:



Words fail me to express how much I love this song, or the whole album, or Warren Zevon's voice, or the memory of lying on the floor in my bedroom listening to these songs at night in the 1970s, which feel now to me like an era of longing, and promise, and . . . well, other fatuous girly stuff that really doesn't seem consistent with listening to Warren Zevon songs, or with reality on the ground, either, but there it was.

This Week's Read-Alouds

Stories of Beowulf Told to the Children
The Shining Company
Mary Poppins Opens the Door

On their own, people are sucking up Hardy Boys and Trixie Belden, while I continue to read Agatha Christie, a.k.a. Trixie Belden for grownups.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

This Week's Favorite Kindle (mostly) Math-Oriented Apps



Mathemagica:  Range of math skills and operations covering all grade levels

Multiplication Genius:  Basically flashcards, but good for drill

Kid Math:  Sort of a flowery space-invaders kind of way to practice facts

Minecraft Pocket Edition:  Work with 3-D shapes and spaces

DragonBox Algebra 5+:  Thank you, Charlotte, for the recommendation.

Others we like:

Art Memory Game (lite)
Famous Paintings
Brain Gems
Journal
Picasso
*Knowledge Tube
SpellingCity
*SaintCast

*Must have web enabled to run these apps, and they don't work in Kindle FreeTime, i.e. the application which lets you set time limits so that you don't have to hover over people or worry about hearing the oven timer. Still, we like them a lot. The 5th grader has been full of cosmological information lately, gleaned from a BBC series on the planets, and we all find the SaintCasts fun. Of course, we can just listen to SaintCast.org on the computer, but the 4th grader especially likes having it on her Kindle, so that she can listen even when nobody else wants to.





Wednesday, September 18, 2013

In Case the Amazingness of My 5th Grader Got Lost . . .

. . . in yesterday's post, let me just say that today he got up at five with his older brother, who had an eight a.m. chemistry class. By the time I emerged at quarter to seven, he had done all his school reading:  Bible, history, geography, literature, geology. I have heard, in great detail, about the Punic Wars, and about the surveying project which established the Maryland-Pennsylvania border, which was the subject of his geography reading. He's done his copywork, followed by half an hour's worth of multiplication drill via a Kindle app (Multiplication Genius, which we really like), and the next Life of Fred chapter on his own.

And he's put his laundry in.

So, it's two minutes to nine in the morning, and he's playing Minecraft. Deservedly. He can join us later for German, but otherwise, the day is his.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Random Quick Tuesday Thoughts About Homeschooling and Some Other Stuff

1. Conversation with My 5th Grader

Him:  Why couldn't you just give us a shorter school day, I mean, cut some of these books and subjects and stuff?

Me: Because then you wouldn't have a very full education, that's why.

Him:  Well, but I mean, The Hound of the Baskervilles is just unnecessary literature.

Me:  Literature is necessary.

Him: Huh.

What we have here is a failure of one philosophy to communicate with another. The Philosophy of 5th Grade Pragmatism is bound to lose to Mom's Inexorable Humanities Vision, just because, but it's determined  to go down fighting. Which is kind of a drag, frankly, but there it is.

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Reading (You, Maybe)

So, ages ago I was writing this story on a private blog to which about five of you were subscribed. Those five people, who had gotten all caught up in the story, were really really nice about the fact that I don't write in a straightforward, linear, "gotta finish Book Seven before the fans start camping out in the kitchen" kind of way. That is, I am not (your favorite author of addictive fiction series here) -- which, I guess, is why, whatever name you inserted in the favorite author of addictive fiction series blank, it probably wasn't mine. Or . . . something. What was I saying?

Oh, right. I was saying that ages ago I was writing this story, but then I didn't know what was supposed to happen next, so I stopped. I put it on pause until such time as I did know what was supposed to happen next. Of course, wouldn't you know that a year or more would elapse, during which time I found out all kinds of poems that needed writing, and some non-fiction articles, too, and also I did some home education all day every day, but I didn't know what happened next in this story.

Until last night, as I was lying in bed trying to fall asleep. A little window opened in my mind, and I saw . . . well, about three hours' worth of action and interaction which advances the story a few painstaking inches forward and also casts what has happened heretofore in such a light that I had to go back and adjust some things, so that they would represent what really happened and not what I thought happened, back when I couldn't see quite so far.

And so it goes. I really wish I had a better working method for fiction writing than "run until a wall looms up, hit it, and fall down,"  but I don't. Anyway, here is the new, improved, expanded, but still unfinished story:

Part One
Part Two
and now
Part Three

For a limited time I'll open up access to the story blog, so you don't have to subscribe. Not that subscribing costs you anything, but it's kind of a headache, especially when the story you've subscribed to dries up for, say, two years. Anyway, enjoy or whatever.

Friday, September 6, 2013

Reading (Kids)

Current and recent pleasure reading:

9-year-old: 
The Boxcar Children (the original story, not the spin-off series)
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Understood Betsy

11-year-old: 
Mary Poppins
Mary Poppins Comes Back
The Hound of the Baskervilles

School Reading:

9-year-old: 

History/British:
The Cambridge Historical Reader

History/Ancient:
The Children's Plutarch:  Tales of the Greeks

Geography:
First Lessons in Geography (a memorize-&-recite kind of thing, like a catechism)
Tree in the Trail

Religion:
Hurlbut's Story of the Bible
Great Moments in Catholic History
Mother Cabrini, Missionary to the World
The First Christians

Science/Nature:
Among the Meadow People
A World in a Drop of Water

Math:
Life of Fred:  Honey

11-year-old: 

History/British:  Story of the English

History/Ancient:  The Children's Plutarch:  Tales of the Romans

Geography:
First Lessons in Geography
Charting the World
Adventures in Geography

Religion:
Pearls of Peace:  A Rosary Journey Through the Holy Land
Hurlbut's Story of the Bible
Great Moments in Catholic History
Father Marquette and the Great Rivers

Science/Nature:
The Practical Geologist
Geology and Fossils Junior Explorer Activity Book

Math:
Life of Fred:  Honey

Lunch-Basket Read-alouds: 
Stories of Beowulf Told to the Children
The Shining Company
Our Island Saints
George Washington's World (continued from last year)
The Adventures of Penrose the Mathematical Cat (topics from our Tuesday MathArt class)

What is the 15-year-old reading? 
All this stuff.  He should be finishing Unit 1 this week.


I, meanwhile, have found several more Agatha Christies to hoover up. Everybody else go read and don't talk to me.



Monday, September 2, 2013

Reading (Me)

Recent or ongoing:

The Moonstone, Wilkie Collins
Glory, Vladimir Nabokov
various Agatha Christie mysteries
The Color of Magic, Terry Pratchett
Speak, Memory, Vladimir Nabokov
Holy Sex, Gregory Popcak
The Power and the Glory, Graham Greene

Kind of a schizophrenic list . . .

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Late Have I Loved You

. . . O Beauty ever ancient, ever new, late have I loved
 you! You were within me, but I was outside, and it was there that I searched for you. In my unloveliness I plunged into the lovely things which you created. You were with me, but I was not with you. Created things kept me from you; yet if they had not been in you they would have not been at all. You called, you shouted, and you broke through my deafness. You flashed, you shone, and you dispelled my blindness. You breathed your fragrance on me; I drew in breath and now I pant for you. I have tasted you, now I hunger and thirst for more. You touched me, and I burned for your peace.

Augustine, Confessions

via

(late have I blogged you, dear companion of my soul's imagination, but a happy feast to you anyway)

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Cooking and the College Girl: Stocking the Kitchen

Let's say you're nineteen, and in six days you go back to school, far far away from Mom and the happy home kitchen, where you just got through washing about eight bazillion dishes so maybe we should be calling this post  Escape From the Happy Home Kitchen,  but anyway.

So say you're going back to school and this year, because you are an official Big Girl On Campus, you are not moving back into the dinky dorm with the electric kettle balanced on the edge of the shared sink, oh no:  you are moving into An Apartment. With Friends. And a Kitchen. And No Meal Plan. Which means . . .

Friday, August 23, 2013

Heart and Leaf

A moment later my first poem began. What touched it off? I think I know. Without any wind blowing, the sheer weight of a raindrop, shining in parasitic luxury on a cordate leaf, caused its tip to dip, and what looked like a globule of quicksilver performed a sudden glissando down the center vein, and then, having shed its bright load, the relieved leaf unbent. Tip, leaf, dip, relief -- the instant it all took to happen seemed to me not so much a fraction of time as a fissure in it, a missed heartbeat, which was refunded at once by a patter of rhymes:  I say "patter" intentionally, for when a gust of wind did come, the trees would briskly start to drip all together in as crude an imitation of the recent downpour as the stanza I was already muttering resembled the shock of wonder I had experienced when for a moment heart and leaf had been one. 

Vladimir Nabokov
Speak, Memory

Back to School, Back to Blogging (maybe)

OK, so it's been ages, during which much rain has fallen, the back porch and everything on it mildewed (first tip-off:  back door, usually white, suddenly spotty black. oh no), and the cosmos grown taller than I am. Even as I write this, the sky above Rebecca's roof next door has assumed its glowering look again, and the dog has become very present. I am also eating sunflower seeds, harvested from our garden and roasted by Crispina, who seems pleased with herself.

This week we're back to school. I don't always love starting back, but this year entering into a routine of reading and other work feels very much like settling into a good warm bath at the end of a long and active day. Summer was great, but man, do I love copywork. For other people.

Here are the schedules we're currently following for the primary grades:

Friday, July 12, 2013

It's a Working Vacation . . .

Breaking my silence to say that student plans for Western Civ 2 are FINISHED! That is, they're drafted, worked out in a useable form with links to most readings, and ready to go -- but also ready to be tweaked, added to, and amended as we use them ourselves.

So come and check them out. I need to edit my course overview for parents somewhat, as I revised our schedule of writing assignments as I did the student plans -- still, if you click the unit links, you can see readings and resources at a glance, in order to preview. In the student plans I did not use absolutely every reading or every resource;  basically I just sketched out what I want my own student to do. This, as I say, is all subject to change as we go, which is one reason I opted not to publish printed plans for this course this year. Comments on the Abandon Hopefully blog are welcome, especially as other people work through the course (as I hope they will!) and add other resources or find that certain things don't work. By the time I do publish a set of printed plans, which I hope will be this time next year, my aim is for them to be a field-tested and collaborative project. Meanwhile, I have to admit that I am pretty proud of what I've knocked together for this year. I think it's a pretty good course.

Sunday, June 30, 2013

Saturday, June 15, 2013

On Ignoring Children

LET THEM HAVE TIME TO THEMSELVES- time that is not overseen, interrupted, controlled, regulated, or organized or watched.  We will see happier, healthier children who are capable of solving their own problems and manipulating their own world rather than expecting somebody else to manipulate it for them.  We will see children who recognize the needs of others sometimes trump their own desires.  We will see better and more giving children who just happen to be HAPPIER.

More . . .  

via Kyra and Melanie and my number-one world-ignoring mechanism, Facebook
 

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Script for a Summertime Mother-Rant

The family is the laboratory of charity -- This is a useful papal-or-saintly soundbyte which I think I just made up, although it's entirely possible that I read it somewhere.

Anyway, the family is the laboratory of charity. Where else you gonna learn it, I ask you? What else are we all doing here? In what other context can you screw it up as thoroughly as we all do screw it up, and come out forgiven and still beloved on the far side?

What does this mean, that the family is the laboratory of charity? Well, on one level I guess it means this:

Monday, June 10, 2013

Homeschooling as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder:UPDATES

Moving us even further into Mater Amabilis Level 2, figuring that it's better to repeat Greece and Rome a little now, and then be ready to move afresh into U.S. History in Level 3. Trying to make all our lives easier and more coherent . . . 

Saturday, June 8, 2013

Jubilate Deo

My favorite round ever. Good in six parts, too. These kids are awfully sweet (and talented):

Friday, June 7, 2013

Abandon Hopefully Western Civ 2, Semester 1 Schedule

Week 1:  Unit 1:  End of Rome
Week 2:  Unit 1 
Week 3:  Unit 1(90-minute timed essay)
Week 4: Unit 2: "Dark Ages"/Anglo-Saxon England
Week 5:  Unit 2
Week 6:  Unit 2
Week 7:  Unit 2
Week 8:  Unit 2
Week 9:  Unit 2 (paper due)
Week 10:  Unit 3: Vikings (optional, if want more time for Unit 4)
Week 11:  Unit 3 (1-hour timed essay)
Week 12: Unit 4:  Middle Ages in England
Week 13: Unit 4
Week 14: Unit 4
Week 15: Unit 4
Week 16: Unit 4 (paper due)
Week 17: REVIEW AND CATCH-UP WEEK
Week 18:  EXAM WEEK (or more review and catch-up if you don't do exams)

And more . . . 

PS: As you can see, parent notes and resource pages for each unit are coming along at a good clip, chiefly because I already had a lot of this information listed on my old curriculum blog. What I'm doing is sketching the year out this way, then going back and knocking together some more detailed weekly plans addressed to students. When I'm finished, I'll do an outline page like this one addressed directly to students, with links to each unit's student plans, for ease of navigation. This I will email to my own son, with directions to flag it, so that it stays at the top of his email inbox. Then, wherever he happens to be, he can access his work.

Enthroning the Heart of Jesus

We didn't manage to do this on the Feast of the Sacred Heart, but today seems like a good day for a rerun:

Apathy, Illness, Enthronement


We have been planning, in the vaguest of ways, since last fall, to hold an Enthronement of the Sacred Heart in our home. Our planning began in November, with a parish mission devoted to this practice and the graces attached to it, but because in our family "planning" mostly means saying at month-long intervals We really need to do thus and such, here it is July and we still haven't done it. That is, it's on the calendar for tonight, and we have people invited and a grocery list and everything, but until it actually occurs, things hang in uncertainty.

I went to Confession this week as part of my preparation for the Enthronement, and one of the things I confessed was that although I had been going through the motions of preparation, saying the Litany of the Sacred Heart and the novena prayers, cleaning the house and planning how to feed people, in my heart, my own distinctly un-sacred heart, I really did not care about any of it. This, as I added to my confessor, is actually what I like about being Catholic:  it's not dependent on my feelings. There's always something to do, and I can do it, and somehow the show stays in the road.

Still, my apathy bothered me. I could attribute it at least partly to the fact that I've never really understood the devotion to the Sacred Heart. I mean, I've read about it. I know what it's about. I know why people have this devotion and why it's important to them. As an onlooker, I find it beautiful and moving. But it's never taken root in me. For one thing, I actively dislike much of the art associated with the Sacred Heart devotion. Sorry, but I do. When I say "beautiful and moving," I am not talking about Our Lord drawing His garments aside with a come-hither look and a center-parted hairdo. That these images speak to many people is indisputable, and I don't mean to make fun of either the images or the people who value them;  still,  I have a hard time getting past them to the devotion itself.

The only way I can manage it now is that our own Sacred Heart image is an icon. And I know, I know, O Eastern Christians of my acquaintance, that this is not a specimen of genuine iconography;  nor is the icon I bought years ago in Glastonbury (that in itself ought to have tipped me off, I guess), of Our Lady seated beside St. John. I know nowthat in traditional iconography Our Lady does not appear in company, except with members of her immediate family, but this knowledge doesn't prevent my still loving that icon. So it is with the Sacred Heart icon. I can deal with it because it's an icon,because it's an image without any particular overlay of identity, because there's no personal expression to get in the way. 

The icon belongs, properly, to Aelred, who bought it long ago, when he was still an Episcopal priest in parish ministry. It hung in his church office for a time, and then, when we moved to England, it lived in his study. He had meant initially to hang it on a wall, but in unpacking he had come across a small metal book stand, and had propped the icon on it, on his desk, as a temporary measure. There it stayed for the entire four years of our sojourn there, and every day he said his prayers before it. With the Sacred Heart at his elbow,  he wrote his doctoral thesis. 

On our return to the U.S., he ceased to have a private study, and the Sacred Heart, with all our other icons, became general family property. Currently our collection hangs, in company with several crucifixes, above our living-room mantel;  tonight we'll have to take the Sacred Heart down before we can enthrone Him, on the same nail He has occupied for some time now already, in an informal and unenthroned way.

So, the icon helps some. The other part of my apathy, though, has less to do with externals, and more to do with the overall status of my soul, which is set to "detachment:  not necessarily the good kind." It was this that I wanted to dredge up, not for the first time, in Confession. My Confessor listened, laughing at appropriate intervals;  apparently I'm frequently really funny in Confession, and I worry that I'm being flippant and inadequately contrite, but he does absolve me, so I guess it's all right. Anyway, what he said to me by way of counsel was, "I guess this is God's way of telling you you really need this Enthronement. But," he added, "don't necessarily expect anything from it."

This was a relief. If there's any silver lining to apathy, after all, it's that you don't really work up much energy for expectations. You go through the motions, you go through the  motions, and whatever happens in the aftermath strikes you out of the blue, as pure gift. I think it probably is the better part of wisdom not to approach an observance like this thinking, "All right, by tomorrow we'll all be walking on water." This is not, I don't think, a failure of faith, but a waiting on God, to see what our instructions are going to be. St. Peter walked on water because he was told to. We won't know what we're told to do until we get into the boat.

Meanwhile, to complicate matters, this week we have been a house of illness. First one person, then another, has been struck down by a brief but thoroughly unpleasant stomach virus, and even as I write, one of us (not me) is recumbent upon the Couch of Near-Death Experiences, reading Dilbert and not laughing very muchFortunately for that person, as well as for our evening plans, the worst of the plague seems to be over;  to be at the stage of recumbency upon the Couch of Near-Death Experiences is to be washed up on a friendly shore after a long night at sea. Still, we're mulling whether or not we should call up everyone and tell them not to come. It's grace we want to share here, not germs. But then, do we enthrone the Sacred Heart by ourselves? After dragging our feet for so long, the thought of putting it off again, when we've finally gotten it all together, is maddening. If we do carry on as planned, do we quarantine the sufferer upstairs and just tell him or her about it later? (obviously the answer would be yes, as opposed to having the sufferer shedding his sufferings on everyone we know). But the thought of carrying on minus a member of the family, when we're finally all here together, is also maddening.

Here we are, then. Aelred has gone off to the grocery store with my long list, which means that either we'll have a house full of people tonight, or we will have an extraordinarily festive family dinner, except for the person who will be feasting on crackers and Gatorade, of course. Either way, I already see that I care more than Ithought I did, and that is a start.

(image source)

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Basket Reading Schedule

For those readers just tuning in, our school day most days (unless we're running out to some midday activity, such as Holy Mass) includes a series of books read aloud to all present. We call this our "Basket Reading," though in fact the "basket" holding our books is not a basket at all, but a plastic milk crate, because we're elegant that way.

Anyway, here's the latest iteration of our schedule for Basket Reading in the upcoming school year:

BASKET READING SCHEDULE 2013-14

Monday:
NO BASKET/GYM AND SWIM

Tuesday:
Famous Men of the Middle Ages
Life of Fred
101 Questions About the Seashore
Novel

Wednesday:
The Road to English
Life of Fred
Young Folks’ Picture History of Music
Novel

Thursday:
NO BASKET/NOON MASS

Friday:
Usborne Art Treasury
Life of Fred

Novel

Independent work schedules: 

Provisional 5th Grade Schedule

Aaaand, here's Level 2/Year 2, a.k.a. 5th grade:


Monday
Thursday


Reading:
Reading:
Pearls of Peace/narrate
Bible
The Adventures of Odysseus
Our Island Story/narrate
Abraham Lincoln’s World
Seabird
Blood and Guts/narrate
Math lesson with Mom
Math lesson with Mom
Copywork
Copywork
Duolingo German


GYM & SWIM
NOON MASS


Tuesday
Friday

Reading:
Reading:
Our Island Saints
Bible
Shakespeare
Literature book
Literature book
Our Island Story/narrate
Math lesson with Mom
Seabird/Adventures in Geography/narrate
Dictation
Historical fiction
Duolingo German
Math lesson with Mom

Copywork
Basket with Mom & C
Duolingo German



Basket with Mom & C



Wednesday



Reading:

Our Island Saints/narrate

Literature book

Abraham Lincoln’s World/narrate

Historical fiction

Math lesson with Mom

Copywork

Duolingo German

Basket with Mom & C

Provisional Grade 4 Schedule

As promised in the Gigantic Primary-School Post, the Level 2/Year 1, a.k.a. 4th grade, Schedule:


Monday
Thursday


Math lesson with Mom
Math lesson with Mom
Copywork
Copywork
Reading:
Reading:
The First Christians/narrate
Our Island Saints/narrate
Andersen’s Fairy Tales
Abraham Lincoln’s World
Our Island Story
Tree in the Trail/narrate
Find the Constellations/narrate


NOON MASS
Gym & Swim



Tuesday
Friday


Math lesson with Mom
Math lesson with Mom
Copywork
Dictation
Duolingo German
Duolingo German
Reading:
Reading:
Our Island Saints/narrate
Bible
Literature book
Shakespeare
Abraham Lincoln’s World/narrate
Sewing With Saint Anne
Tree in the Trail

Historical fiction book
Basket with Mom and H


Basket with Mom and H



Wednesday



Math lesson with Mom

Copywork

Duolingo German

Reading:

Bible/narrate

Literature book

Our Island Story/narrate

Historical fiction book



Basket with Mom and H